PC

Topic   Slow boot = fried motherboard? Solved 8/22?

Tony
Double Gold Good Trader
* 8-Aug(#1)
I try to help in our church office by taking care of their computers. I'm out of town, so they called in a technician who runs his own company to figure out why one of the systems is booting slowly in the morning. His opinion is that "the motherboard is fried".

I haven't seen the system boot, so I don't know the definition of "slowly" in this case.

Shadow_StarLust
Gold Good Trader
8-Aug(#2)
Could be so much bloatware.
RagingShadow07
GameTZ Subscriber Double Gold Good Trader Has Written 17 Reviews
8-Aug(#3)
Much higher chance it'll be a slow hard drive or tons of bloat. A bad board generally means the system won't boot at all.

bluemetal04
GameTZ Subscriber Silver Good Trader Global Trader - willing to trade internationally This user is in chat NOW Secret Santa
9-Aug(#4)
If the motherboard was fried, the computer wouldn't start up at all lol. I think it's just the harddrive. Upgrading to SSD would be a good improvement.
Foxhack
GameTZ Subscriber 300 Trade Quintuple Gold Good Trader Gold Global Trader (7)
9-Aug(#5)
It could be a lot of things.

It might be the hard drive failing to start up, it might be the power supply not feeding enough power to a component, it might be bloatware, it might be a faulty hard drive connection cable...

My bet is that the hard drive is starting to crap up.
willyum
GameTZ Gold Subscriber 300 Trade Quintuple Gold Good Trader Gold Global Trader (17) Secret Santa
* 10-Aug(#6)
I agree with Foxhack that the hard drive is on its last breath. I had a computer that suddenly took forever to boot, and then it stopped entirely. The issue stopped once I swapped the hard drive; and strangely enough, it wasn't even the primary drive where the OS was installed.

mdh
Double Gold Good Trader
* 13-Aug(#7)
Use Crystal Disk Info to check the health of your hard drives.
SirConnery
GameTZ Gold Subscriber 1000 Trade Quintuple Gold Good Trader This user is on the site NOW (2 minutes ago) Secret Santa
14-Aug(#8)
Bad motherboard usually means no boot.

Although I'd check for bad capacitors.

Open the system and look for capacitors with bubble tops or leaking. They should be perfectly flat if they're ok.

image
Tony
Double Gold Good Trader
16-Aug(#9)
Thank you all for your input.

I finally got back and had a chance to look at the computer.

It is a Dell Inspiron 518. I was told it was taking about an hour to boot. I turned it off and back on while in the office. The Dell screen with the progress bar came up and appeared to lock at about 50% for at least a couple of minutes. I walked away and when I looked back at it about 10 minutes later it was at the Windows log in screen.

I took the computer home. I downloaded and ran CrystalDiskInfo, but it showed everything Good. I ran AVG and Malwarebytes, but they didn't find any errors. I ran CCleaner and fixed the Registry problems it found.

I turned the system off and looked inside. It was a bit dusty, but the connections were tight and everything (including the capacitors) looked good.

I turned it off and on a few times, and it booted to the Windows log in screen in less than 30 seconds each time. I'm going to let it cool and see how it boots in the morning.
SirConnery
GameTZ Gold Subscriber 1000 Trade Quintuple Gold Good Trader This user is on the site NOW (2 minutes ago) Secret Santa
16-Aug(#10)
Dell screen with progress bar? Are you talking about the logo that is shown upon turning it on, or that bar you see when it's coming out of hibernation?

If it has that huge Dell logo when first turning it on and it's sitting there for an hour, it makes me thing you need a new CR2032 flat cell cmos battery installed. It keeps your date, time, device info.
Tony
Double Gold Good Trader
* 17-Aug(#11)
SirConnery wrote:
> Dell screen with progress bar? Are you talking about the logo that is shown upon
> turning it on, or that bar you see when it's coming out of hibernation?
>
> If it has that huge Dell logo when first turning it on and it's sitting there for
> an hour, it makes me thing you need a new CR2032 flat cell cmos battery installed.
> It keeps your date, time, device info.

8/16/2017 Yes, it is the Dell logo screen. There is a progress bar that so far shows about 50%, about 80%, and then goes away. So far I've rebooted about 10 times with no problems. Every time but one (so far) since I brought it home it has gone past the Dell logo screen to the Windows login screen in about 5 seconds. The one time it didn't, it went to the dot circle (like it was updating - although it hadn't been connected to the 'net) for a few seconds before going to the Windows login screen.

8/17/2017 I booted 5-6 times again this morning with no problems. I took it back to the office, reconnected everything, and when it wouldn't get past the logo screen after several minutes I shut it off. Thinking the problem was environmental I disconnected the network cable, but it still wouldn't boot. I reconnected the network cable, and disconnected the USB cables (ink jet and laser printer) and it booted fine. I repeated the boot just to make sure and it again booted fine. I reconnected the ink jet printer and it wouldn't boot. It seemed odd that this would be the problem, so I disconnected it again, but this time with no USB cables connected it still wouldn't boot. I shut down and tried again, but it still wouldn't boot.
willyum
GameTZ Gold Subscriber 300 Trade Quintuple Gold Good Trader Gold Global Trader (17) Secret Santa
17-Aug(#12)
Wow. That is strange! wry smile

Foxhack
GameTZ Subscriber 300 Trade Quintuple Gold Good Trader Gold Global Trader (7)
17-Aug(#13)
I'm reminded of my old computer, which had a lot of problems booting because one SATA port was going bad.

Go to "Run" and type "Event Viewer" (without the " of course), and hit enter. Then select "Windows Logs", and then choose "System". Look around for events that happened around the time the machine finally managed to boot. Maybe it'll show stuff that could help out. That's how I pinpointed my SATA issue, by checking the error logs.
Tony
Double Gold Good Trader
17-Aug(#14)
Evening 08/17/2017

I brought the system home and it has booted fine in three attempts. At this point the problems still appear environmental, but the only items unique to the office are the power cord, the wireless keyboard and mouse (Logitech), and the monitor. Sometime in the next few days I am going to take it to the church and connect it to a different set of peripherals.

Foxhack: I looked at the System error logs, but I wasn't sure of what I was looking at. There were over 2,000 entries for the last few days: mostly "information" entries, a few "Warning" entries, a few "Error" entries, and a few "Critical" entries. The error entries were mostly "DistributedCOM" and "System Control Manager". The Critical entries appeared to all say "Kernel-power". However, they didn't appear to correlate to all of the failed boot attempts.
SirConnery
GameTZ Gold Subscriber 1000 Trade Quintuple Gold Good Trader This user is on the site NOW (2 minutes ago) Secret Santa
18-Aug(#15)
I looked up your model. Try running the built in dell diagnostics:

"Turn on your computer and use the integrated diagnostics utility that's included with your dell computer. I believe that once you turn your computer on, keep on tapping the "F12" key to bring up the boot menu. Then select the Dell Diagnostics Utility."
Tony
Double Gold Good Trader
18-Aug(#16)
SirConnery wrote:
> I looked up your model. Try running the built in dell diagnostics:
>
> "Turn on your computer and use the integrated diagnostics utility that's included
> with your dell computer. I believe that once you turn your computer on, keep on tapping
> the "F12" key to bring up the boot menu. Then select the Dell Diagnostics Utility."

I ran the diagnostic this afternoon, but it didn't appear to find anything. After letting it run the full diagnostic (including the full memory test), it just said to reboot.
SirConnery
GameTZ Gold Subscriber 1000 Trade Quintuple Gold Good Trader This user is on the site NOW (2 minutes ago) Secret Santa
18-Aug(#17)
Being a Dell my gut tells me it's your clock battery or power supply. Those are the biggest Dell issues I see. Click battery is cheapest at under $3.
Tony
Double Gold Good Trader
20-Aug(#18)
SirConnery wrote:
> Being a Dell my gut tells me it's your clock battery or power supply. Those are the
> biggest Dell issues I see. Click battery is cheapest at under $3.

I pulled the battery and checked it with my VOM. It read a steady +3.24 V.

I've started it at least half a dozen more times and it has yet to boot even remotely slowly here at home. I know it sounds crazy, but the problems still seems to be environmental. At this point all I can think of is to take it and a different monitor into the office and try again.
Uppercat
Double Gold Good Trader Global Trader - willing to trade internationally
21-Aug(#19)
"Yay and I bestow unto thee, thine book of Mac, for shall never there be Windows in the house of God"

- Corinthians
Tony
Double Gold Good Trader
22-Aug(#20)
I took the system back to the office yesterday, but I got pulled into another project and didn't get to spend much time with it.

I hooked up the power cord and monitor and the system booted fine. I booted a second time to confirm it was starting OK.

I connected the HP printer that caused the problem when I tested it last week. It would not boot. I powered down and disconnected the printer, but it still would not boot. I left it on for over an hour and it still hadn't booted. I shut it off, left it to sit about a minute, and it still wouldn't boot.

I brought the system home again and it booted fine this morning with USB devices in two of the four ports on the back including the one I had plugged the HP printer into.

I'm guessing the printer (or perhaps just the cord) is affecting the boot somehow. Once the problem starts, the system needs to be completely powered down to clear it. I'm going to uninstall the HP printer and software and use another printer cable when I reinstall.

If anyone has any other ideas, please let me know.
Uppercat
Double Gold Good Trader Global Trader - willing to trade internationally
22-Aug(#21)
Have you tried an exorcism?
Foxhack
GameTZ Subscriber 300 Trade Quintuple Gold Good Trader Gold Global Trader (7)
22-Aug(#22)
That's starting to sound like a short on the USB port to me.
SirConnery
GameTZ Gold Subscriber 1000 Trade Quintuple Gold Good Trader This user is on the site NOW (2 minutes ago) Secret Santa
22-Aug(#23)
Hmm I should check what model the two machines I have in my shop are. Both Dell, both have faulty USB ports. I just disabled the ports and used a pci to USB card as replacement.
Tony
Double Gold Good Trader
22-Aug(#24)
The problem appears to be solved. When I got to the office today, the HP B210 printer power button was lit, but there was nothing on the touchscreen. Nothing I did brought up the menu. I disconnected the printer's power cord, waited a few seconds, then reconnected it. The menu appeared.

With the printers disconnected, I booted the machine and uninstalled the HP printer. I powered down, reconnected the Lexmark laser, and it booted fine. I reconnected the HP printer using a different printer cord, and it booted fine. It reinstalled the printer driver.

With everything reconnected as it was before, the machine has booted fine at least a dozen times. I will let you know if it fails again.

Thanks for all of your responses.

Topic   Slow boot = fried motherboard? Solved 8/22?